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Brown-Sequard Syndrome

Description

Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) is a rare neurological condition characterized by a lesion in the spinal cord which results in weakness or paralysis (hemiparaplegia) on one side of the body and a loss of sensation (hemianesthesia) on the opposite side. BSS may be caused by a spinal cord tumor, trauma (such as a puncture wound to the neck or back), ischemia (obstruction of a blood vessel), or infectious or inflammatory diseases such as tuberculosis, or multiple sclerosis.

Treatment

Generally treatment for individuals with BSS focuses on the underlying cause of the disorder. Early treatment with high-dose steroids may be beneficial in many cases. Other treatment is symptomatic and supportive.

Prognosis

The prognosis for individuals with BSS varies depending on the cause of the disorder.

Research

The NINDS supports and conducts a wide range of research on spinal cord disorders such as BSS. The goal of this research is to find ways to prevent, treat, and, ultimately, cure these disorders. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlusSpinal Cord Diseases

United Spinal Association

Address:
120-34 Queens Boulevard, #320
Kew Gardens, NY 11415

Website: http://www.spinalcord.org
Phone: 718-803-3782; 800-962-9629
Fax: 866-387-2196

The United Spinal Association is dedicated to improving the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of Americans living with the results of spinal cord injury and disease (SCI/D) and their families. NSCIA, educates and empowers survivors of SCI/D to achieve and maintain the highest levels of independence, health and personal fulfillment.



Information sourced through CNF’s partnership with The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), US National Institutes of Health.